Hose not connected to anything/rough idling

Discussion in 'Mechanical Problems & Technical Chat' started by thaivex, Dec 1, 2018.

  1. thaivex

    thaivex New Member

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    IMG_5921.JPG IMG_5922.JPG IMG_5923.JPG I recently started doing all of my own mechanical work on my car. I got in an accident back in April or May, my car, a 2012 Honda Civic Si, hydroplaned and I hit a guardrail, and messed up my front end, however mechanically it was fine. I didn't have collision coverage, so I paid for it out of pocket. I decided that to help save myself money I would start doing my own mechanical work. I recently changed my MTF (oem honda fluid), my oil and filter (Amsoil Signature Series w/ oem honda filter), flushed my coolant and replaced with oem honda coolant, changed the spark plugs and in NGK spark plugs, replaced my engine and cabin air filter, and changed my pcv valve. I'm doing a lot of this work for the first time, and I'm super excited to be doing my own mechanical work. I discovered that my engine outtake (maybe intake?) was not connected, so I fixed that, then I found a hose near the engine not connected to anything. I'll post pictures. Can anyone help me figure out what these lines go to? I don't know if it's the reason my car has been idling rough, but I can also post video of that, it it helps any. The mechanic said it might be a coolant line. I cannot figure out for the life of me what they connect to, as they don't reach anything. Thank you.
     
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  2. thaivex

    thaivex New Member

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    The lastpicture is what I think the hoses might connect to, but I honestly have no clue.
     
  3. webby
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  4. thaivex

    thaivex New Member

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    I have no clue. I don't suppose there is a way to find out? Yeah, I bought it 102,000 miles, so that's why I did all of that maintenance recently. I'm glad I did, the MTF was black, and the oil needed to be changed too.
     
  5. thaivex

    thaivex New Member

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    Okay, I'm confused though. Is something missing? I see that there are hoses supposed to be hooked up to those two points, but I can't really tell which hoses are supposed to hook up to which one, and they don't reach, they aren't long enough.
     
  6. webby
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    if you follow the first couple of steps to his diy to remove your intake tube you'll see it -

    I don't have photoshop on this computer, but look at what is circled in yellow. These are pics from that DIY.

    To expose the throttle body (bottom left) like it is in the pictures below, you'll need to probably remove your intake tube as he does in his diy. In your 2nd pic you show the 2 ports. Those 2 ports are circled below.

    yellow 2.jpg

    The one in your hand is the top yellow one circled in the pic below.
    yellow.jpg

    Best bet is to pull your intake tube off following the diy and see what coolant lines are actually there, or if you have some missing/cut short.
     
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  7. thaivex

    thaivex New Member

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    Okay, so that DIY was super helpful. Here is what I discovered. My intuition was correct, those lines were meant to connect to those two ports on the engine. The reason why the shorter one in the first picture wouldn't connect was because it was the wrong tube. The tube that connected to the bottom port was too long, when I tried to connect it where it was supposed to go, it kinked up the line, and that shorter line barely reached that top port. I had to disconnect the third tube a little deeper done, and lucky me, coolant started pouring everywhere, but I was ready with the shorter tube I pulled off, and stuck it on there real quick. It connected perfectly. The hardest part was pulling all of the tubes off, they were super stubborn, and that third tube down a little deeper was the worst one to get off. My coolant was low, and my reservoir was, as far as I could tell, empty. I guess because everything wasn't connected correctly. By any chance, is there a possibility that I can hold the body shop liable for not having everything hooked up correctly? That third line was connect in the wrong place, so I don't even know what my coolant was being dumped into, and of course those first two tubes that I posted weren't connected to anything, and that bottom port on the engine was where that third coolant line connected to. Fortunately, I had some Honda coolant left-over from when I did my coolant flush, so I was able to fill up my reservoir, and top off the radiator. My main concern is what damage may have been done to the engine. I'm guessing I should still take it to a mechanic? I fixed everything and have it all connected properly, but I am worried about what effect this may have had on my engine. Thank you again for the super helpful response. You're a lifesaver.
     

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  8. webby
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    I highly doubt the body shop was doing anything with your coolant lines off your intake manifold unless you has some seriously bad damage to your car/intake. Even then, I find it unlikely. I would still imagine the previous owner had some type of aftermarket intake on the car.
     
  9. thaivex

    thaivex New Member

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    You're probably right. Should I take my car to the mechanic to get the engine checked out? Do you think anything may have been permanently damaged?
     
  10. webby
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    A mechanic won't have anything really to look at unless they're pulling your head, and even then it's not something they should advise you doing if nothing is wrong with the car. If you're interested in knowing how the car is doing, pay $28 for oil analysis from blackstone labs. Send them an oil sample from your next oil change. Do it a couple of times if you want to see if it's trending good/bad and they'll have a break down of all the wear metals and whatnot found. Example of a report - http://9thcivic.com/forum/threads/blackstone-lab-oil-analysis.6491/

    https://www.blackstone-labs.com
     
  11. dpetro1

    dpetro1 Well-Known Member

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    Some people disconnect those lines because they feel it reduces heatsoak in the intake.
    The coolant lines are there to help for cold start, having them disconnected can't hurt your engine.

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
     
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  12. Nomar06
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    :yeahthat: in the old 8thGen Civics everyone that lived in warmer areas of the country would do this. I ran it similar to thins on my old 8thgen for 60k-70k miles with no issues.
     
  13. Flightmaster127
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    Flightmaster127 Supporting Member

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    The low coolant could have been from when you did the flush. If you didn't bleed the system properly your level could drop as the air is pushed into the radiator. You would know if you were puking the coolant out somewhere.

    You said you replaced the PCV valve. Double check all your intake hoses to make sure they are all tight. You could have a small vacuum leak which would can lead to idle issues. Is the idle higher than normal at all? Also you may want to consider doing the idle relearn procedure. Disconnect your battery for about 15 minutes then reconnect it and start the car. Let it sit and idle for about 15 minutes without touching the throttle. Also make sure you have your radio code written down when you disconnect the battery just in case, should be in the owners manual.
     
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  14. Nomar06
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    BTW....since you are past the 100k mile mark, you should take the car in to have the valves adjusted. I would ask the dealer you got it from to see if they did it before you bought the car.

    I would think that they did not do it but wouldn't hurt to ask..
     
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