DIY 2012 Civic Sliding Armrest

jasonandre

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DIY 2012 Civic Sliding Armrest

armrest_erection.gif

This article covers the sliding armrest installation for model year 2012. 2013 models already have this feature as standard.
Shown here is it installed on a 2012 Civic Si. Part numbers for all lines are included below.

Caution!: At the time of this writing, I cannot verify that this procedure is the same for lines other than the Si, so proceed at your own risk. Additionally, the colors for the 2013 models have changed and may not match your interior. I can only confirm that the interior color and material for the 2013 Si is the same as the 2012 Si.
Should someone verify to me that the installation process and colors on other lines, I will update this DIY accordingly.

Click on any of the pictures here to see them in a higher resolution.

What you need:
  • Top Coat Assembly
  • Hinge Assembly
  • Philips Screwdriver
  • Dash removal trim tool (optional)
  • Shop towels (two recommended)
Honda Part Numbers:

You only need three parts: One (1) Hinge Assembly, one (1) Top Coat Assembly, and one (1) Garnish R.R.
  • Please choose the Top Coat color that matches your interior.
  • For the Si, there is only one choice for each part; the Top Coat Assembly is simply called the Armrest Assembly.
  • The Hinge Assembly is the same part number for all lines in both 2 Door and 4 Door.
2 Door (Coupe)
LX & EX:
EX-L:
Si:
4 Door (Sedan)
HX, LX, & EX:
EX-L:
Si:
Important Notes:
  • Be extremely careful in the handling of the rear console panel and clips particularly. The plastic parts can be forgiving, but the clips holding them in place are not.
  • Even being as careful as possible, clips still do break. You can purchase replacements directly from Honda, your local dealership, or from one of our wonderful vendors right here on this site.
  • The assembly parts come from the factory already lubricated with grease. Use one or more shop towels for placing the parts on and for wiping your hands. You do not want to stain your upholstery.
Let's Begin:
  1. Remove the rear console panel.
    The panel is tightly fitted with six retaining clips. My recommendation is to use something smooth, round, and pointed at the end. A dash removal trim tool is what was used here.
    Note: Using a sharp tool is not recommend as it can damage the panel.



  2. Remove the screw.


  3. Remove the rod.
    Turn the metal tab counter-clockwise, then pull the tab towards you to remove the metal rod.
    Place the rod onto a shop towel to keep the grease from getting onto your hands and upholstery.
    The Armrest Assembly should now lift of with ease.




  4. Remove the excess mounting bracket from your new Top Coat Assembly.
    To do so, remove all five screws (green arrows), then use your dash removal trim tool to push inward a mounting clip (blue arrows), as indentified in the photos below. The clips are in-between the fabric and the bracket. You only need to push one in, then the entire bracket will come loose.
    Note: Honda included two mounting brackets with the Si; one attached to the Top Coat Assembly and one attached to the Hinge Assembly. You only need one bracket.
    I do not know if Honda included it by accident or not, so I'm going to assume that this is standard operating procedure.





  5. Attach your new Top Coat Assembly to the new Hinge Assembly.
    Sorry, no photos for this step as I forgot to do so; however, you probably don't need one anyway.
    It's difficult to show you exactly where and how to line up the bracket with the Top Coat, but you should be able to eye it out. Although you won't hear any clicking sounds to indicate a firm connection, you'll know you have it seated correctly when you can no longer use your fingers to separate the bracket from the Top Coat.

  6. Reconnect the armrest assembly.
    Reinsert the Armrest Assembly back into place in the center console and line it up with holes where the rod will go.
    Reinsert the rod and be sure to push it as far inward as it can go. You'll notice that the end of the rod with the metal tab has an oval-rectangle joint that must align with the same-shaped joint on the Armrest Assembly. Once you have it aligned and fully inserted, push the metal tab back into it's original position and mount the screw.
    You'll know you have the rod correctly in place when you can see it on the other end as shown in the second photo below.
    Note: It is easier to reassemble the rod when the Armrest Assembly is closed.




  7. Install the new rear console panel.

    031a.sized.jpg
That's it, you're all done!

Here are a few photos of it installed in its retracted and extended positions.




And here is a photo showing the size difference between the old and new armrest. The old armrest is at the bottom.



Photo showing the design difference between the old and new rear console panel. The new armrest is at the bottom.

004_G_003.sized.jpg
 
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djax

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This is fantastic. Thank you for the write-up! Also, thank you to meatball_84 for being the "trail blazer" and initiating this DIY project. Hopefully there will be many more "2013 to 2012 Civic" DIYs in the near future. Cheers :beer:
 
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jasonandre

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the level of detail in your diy's.... :bowdownsit:

:bighug: awesome as always. Thank you!
This article is relatively short compared to my others. It took me three hours to compile and post this one.
 

Monk

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This article is relatively short compared to my others. It took me three hours to compile and post this one.
I'm guessing it took more time to post the DIY than to do the exchange......... Thank you, excellent DIY , no questions here.
meatball_84 Hip-Hip..... for the heads up.
 

meatball_84

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The install is the same for an EX. Just do it, you won't regret it. And thanks OP for doing the DIY. My A.D.D kicked in and... OH! Shiny Ball!
 

jasonandre

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This is true...there seems to be a slight rub when opening it, so I'm going to eventually order the rear console panel from the 2013 to see if it color-matches the 2012 Si.
 

squiggy

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This is true...there seems to be a slight rub when opening it, so I'm going to eventually order the rear console panel from the 2013 to see if it color-matches the 2012 Si.


Can you identify the spot where it rubs and would it be possible to do a little trimming without doing too much damage or being noticeable just in case the color does not match?
 

jasonandre

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Can you identify the spot where it rubs and would it be possible to do a little trimming without doing too much damage or being noticeable just in case the color does not match?
Not really. I don't see any visible sign of rubbing, just the tactile feedback I feel when opening it.
But Paul is referring to the rear console panel shown in the very first photo. Apparently replacing that panel with a 2013 version solves the problem.

004a_002.sized.jpg
 

squiggy

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Not really. I don't see any visible sign of rubbing, just the tactile feedback I feel when opening it.
But Paul is referring to the rear console panel shown in the very first photo. Apparently replacing that panel with a 2013 version solves the problem.

As long as the color matches...
 

squiggy

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There's only two ways to find out at the moment, and I can't afford another car.

You mean you don't want to have a full set of replacement parts? :hiding:

Seriously, though, I was just curious if there was a potential solution in case the color doesn't match or maybe some people may be willing to trim a piece down to avoid an additional expense.
 
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